Category Archives: About poets

ABOUT POETS: REBECCA WATTS

East Anglian Times, 24 October 2016: "A Suffolk writer in Cambridge. 'It’s good to be able to show there’s a whole community doing this – it is a real thing; not just this dreamy, ethereal pastime,' says Rebecca Watts"
East Anglian Times, 24 October 2016: “A Suffolk writer in Cambridge. ‘It’s good to be able to show there’s a whole community doing this – it is a real thing; not just this dreamy, ethereal pastime,’ says Rebecca Watts”

St John’s College, Cambridge, introduces Rebecca Watts as follows:

Rebecca is originally from Suffolk and first moved to Cambridge in 2001 to study English at Trinity College, and then to Oxford to complete a Master’s in 20th-century English literature. She has been writing poetry for eight years and works part-time in the College Library, opting for a part-time role to invest more time in her poetry. Her work has been published in various magazines and publications, including PN Review, the poetry magazine edited by Michael Schmidt, who was writer in residence at St John’s from 2012 to 2015 and is editorial and managing director of Carcanet Press. Eleven of Rebecca’s poems featured in Carcanet’s New Poetries VI: An Anthology (2015), featuring 21 poets from Cambridge and further afield.

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ABOUT POETS: ROBYN BOLAM

Robyn Bolam, photographed by Mark Lanigan for Bloodaxe Books
Robyn Bolam, photographed by Mark Lanigan for Bloodaxe Books

The British Council introduces Robyn Bolam as follows:

Robyn Bolam (formerly published as Marion Lomax) was born in Newcastle in 1953 and grew up in Northumberland in the north of England. Educated at Newcastle upon Tyne Polytechnic and the University of Kent, she gained her doctorate from the University of York in 1983 and is now Professor of Literature at St Mary’s College, Strawberry Hill, where she has taught since 1987. She began publishing as Robyn Bolam in December 2000.

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ABOUT POETS: DAVID HARSENT

David Harsent: ‘My teachers were bullying ignoramuses.’ Photograph: Eamonn McCabe for the Guardian, 18 January 2015
David Harsent: ‘My teachers were bullying ignoramuses.’ Photograph: Eamonn McCabe for the Guardian, 18 January 2015

The British Council introduced David Harsent as follows (in 2011):

David Harsent has published nine full collections of poetry and several limited editions, and has received a number of literary awards, including the Eric Gregory Award, the Geoffrey Faber Award, the Cheltenham Festival Prize, two Arts Council Bursaries and a Society of Authors Travel Fellowship. His earlier collection, Legion, won the Forward Prize for best collection 2005 and was shortlisted for both the Whitbread Award and the T.S. Eliot Prize. His Selected Poems was published in June 2007, and was shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize.

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ABOUT POETS: YRSA DALEY-WARD

Photograph of Yrsa Daley-Ward by Nicole Nodland for the BBC, 7 January 2018
Photograph of Yrsa Daley-Ward by Nicole Nodland for the BBC, 7 January 2018

The Guardian writes about poet and model Yrsa Daley-Ward as follows:

“If you’re afraid to write it, that’s a good sign. I suppose you know you’re writing the truth when you’re terrified.” These words in black type on a white background make up one of poet Yrsa Daley-Ward’s Instagram posts. This monochrome snapshot of her innermost thoughts has more than 5,200 “likes”. That’s more than double the number she gets for any pictures. Daley-Ward spent her late teens and early 20s as a model struggling to pay her rent in London, working for brands such as Apple, Topshop, Estée Lauder and Nike. She still models today. Ironically, however, it was the image-obsessed medium of Instagram that enabled her to pursue the written word.

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ABOUT POETS: LIZ BERRY

Guardian, 21 November 2014; "Black Country” by Liz Berry, poetry review – ‘love flowed out of me like honey’
Guardian, 21 November 2014; “Black Country” by Liz Berry, poetry review – ‘love flowed out of me like honey’

The Poetry Archive introduces Liz Berry as follows:

Liz Berry was born and brought up in the Black Country, and now lives in Birmingham. She received an Eric Gregory Award in 2009, and an Arvon-Jerwood mentorship in 2011, and in 2012 she won the Poetry London competition. Her debut pamphlet, The Patron Saint of School Girls, was published by tall-lighthouse in 2010. Black Country (Chatto & Windus, 2014) was a Poetry Book Society recommendation, and winner of the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. She is assistant poetry editor at Ambit magazine.

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ABOUT POETS: JOHN SIDDIQUE

Combustus website, 27 November 2012: "John Siddique, British poet, essayist, author"
Combustus website, 27 November 2012: “John Siddique, British poet, essayist, author”

John Siddique introduces himself as follows in his website:

John Siddique is a spiritual teacher, poet, essayist and author. The Spectator describes him as ‘A Stellar British Poet,’ and The Times of India calls him ‘Rebellious by nature, pure at heart.’ He is the author of Full Blood, Recital – An Almanac, Poems From A Northern Soul, and The Prize. His poetry collection Don’t Wear It On Your Head is a perennial favourite with younger readers. He is the co-author of the story/memoir Four Fathers.

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ABOUT POETS: BERNADINE EVARISTO


The British writer and poet Bernadine Evaristo introduces herself as follows in her website:

Bernadine Evaristo is the award-winning author of seven books and numerous other published and produced works that span the genres of novels, poetry, verse fiction, short fiction, essays, literary criticism, and radio and theatre drama. She is also an editor of anthologies and special issues of magazines. Her writing and projects are based around her interest in the African diaspora. She is Professor of Creative Writing at Brunel University London.

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ABOUT POETS: KAREN McCARTHY WOOLF

Guardian, 23 November 2014

Versopolis introduces Karen McCarthy Woolf as follows:

Born in London to English and Jamaican parents, Karen McCarthy Woolf holds a Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Prize and an AHRC doctoral scholarship at Royal Holloway, University of London, where she is exploring ecological poetry, the city and loss. Her collection An Aviary of Small Birds (Carcanet, 2014) commemorates a baby son who died in childbirth and is a Forward Prize Best First Collection nomination. The title poem has been translated into Spanish and was dropped by helicopter over the Houses of Parliament by the Chilean collective Casagrande. Karen has a longstanding interest in cross-arts practice: she has collaborated with artists, filmmakers, musicians and choreographers, presented her work as installation and performed in the UK, US and Europe. The editor of three anthologies, most recently Ten: The New Wave (Bloodaxe, 2014), she is currently resident at the National Maritime Museum, where she is responding to an exhibition on international migration.

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